A call to us to pay better attention | Parashat Ha’azinu

The Torah reading for this Shabbat, Haazinu, is a song with which Moses ends his final instructions to the Jewish People. (...) Haazinu is an…

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Do We Know God’s Name; Does God Know Our Name? | Parashat Va’era

For many people, life is a search for the presence of God in their lives. For a person to know God is with him or her can give great comfort during times of loss and pain, as well as strength when decisions need to be made and the correct path to them is not clear.

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Without Another Word | Parashat Vayigash

Last week’s Torah portion concluded when Joseph accused his brothers of stealing his goblet and promised to enslave Benjamin. At the outset of Parashat Vayigash, Judah approaches Joseph, begging him to reconsider. (…) The Judah who approaches Joseph is markedly different from the Judah who seemed comfortable with the idea of selling Joseph into slavery and faking his death (Gen. 37:27).

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The Forbearance We Need As We Reconnect | Parashat Miketz

At this holiday season, we are all eager, maybe more than ever before, to be able to gather with our loved ones. After an extended and ongoing world heath crisis, during which many of us have had to forgo family and other gatherings, we are desperate to reconnect and celebrate our times of light and joy together.

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Making Circles, Finding Stillness | Parashat Vayeshev

The time has come to teach the communities in which we have congregations what Reform Judaism provides them for their Jewish survival. This week’s Torah portion still teaches us about our defining principles: that our struggle with the past and then taking the risks of transformative change is how we became Israel, a community with a destiny of freedom and hope.

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Reform Judaism: a Movement worth the Struggle | Parashat Vayishlach

The time has come to teach the communities in which we have congregations what Reform Judaism provides them for their Jewish survival. This week’s Torah portion still teaches us about our defining principles: that our struggle with the past and then taking the risks of transformative change is how we became Israel, a community with a destiny of freedom and hope.

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Between a Rock and a Holy Place | Parashat Vayetze

The word Vayetze, the first word of our Parasha, means to leave. But Rashi notices that the Torah does not use the word Vayelech, a word with a similar meaning, which it used to describe Abraham’s journey. As Rashi notes, Vayelech means to leave with one’s possessions and with great honor; Vayetze means to flee, taking nothing with you. Jacob fled for his life.

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